Live your dream NOW.

The stress of waiting.

The list is long when it comes to student stress. But by far, one of the greatest sources of stress is waiting!

Students are always forecasting into the future. Every single moment of student life is about waiting. Waiting for grades. Waiting for summer. Waiting for graduation.

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Forever in a day.

Students become frustrated waiting for what feels like a lifetime to practice the profession they’re in school for.

Textbook readings, class lectures, and endless exams seem miles away from actually doing their dream job.

Days become weeks, weeks become months, months become years. Time moves at a snail’s pace.

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Infinity in their minds.

For students, there are too many years before they can finally live their lifelong dream of becoming a nurse, a lawyer, a carpenter, a designer, a psychologist.

“Don’t worry, it will all be worth it in the end”. Easy for a professor to say. Challenging for a student to live. A day is infinity in a student’s mind.

(Little do they know that one day they will look back and fondly recall their college years as the best years of their lives.)

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 Bridging the (time) gap.

Listening to students lament year after year about the waiting game got me thinking (and dreaming) of a better way! Asking myself how I could bridge the (time) gap between education and profession.

My goal is to help students claim ownership of their present time. To help them live their dream job every single day. To remind them that life purpose does not require a job to be realized.

No more waiting.

Students do not have to wait a lifetime to experience their dream job. Instead, they could live the core elements of their chosen profession every single day – in so many wonderful ways. Simply by living on purpose, in present time.

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Accounting students could help their friends get a better understanding of their finances. Show their neighbours how to do their taxes.

Carpentry students could assist their family in the renovation of a kitchen.

Child and Youth care workers could volunteer at an after school program.

Nursing students could help out an elderly couple at the grocery store.

Social work students could give a seminar at a college residence about mental health.

Seniors could show first years the best spots to study on campus. Listening fully, completely to every freshman they meet.

Living your dreams. Every single day.

Using “bite size” mission statements,  I help students identify the key attributes of their dream profession.

During this exercise, students realize that “Life Purpose” is 99% about LIFE. Something they live every single day.

And that no one needs to wait one more year, one more day, or even one more moment to live life to the fullest.

Ultimately, students (and their professor) discover that Life Purpose is about following their heart, sharing their gifts, and shining their light.

One bite size dream at a time.

Related Post: Shine Your Light

28 thoughts on “Live your dream NOW.

  1. “Don’t dream your life, live your dream” – a statement I can very much relate to. I decided to embark on my transition this year and suddenly my whole sense of self and empowerment has lifted. I am no longer constrained by wishing, I can now do!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Totally agree! I’ve always suggested that people do what’s associated with their field. I followed the same advice (years ago). I was in school to be a teacher, so I worked at a pre-school on campus. It helps keep you focused, and like you said, you’re living your purpose everyday!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Good for you Dr. K! Staying connected to your dream is essential for staying motivated.

      I went straight from undergraduate to graduate school, with no break. 10 years of schooling in a row. (Thank God for scholarships.) Where I often felt lost & miles away from being a psychologist.

      My motivation began to quickly fade as time passed on… UNTIL I began working in the field. If only 5 hours a week, at a time. I sourced out opportunities & created jobs were there were none.

      My uninterrupted education marathon made working in the field of psychology that much more essential for my motivation and purpose.

      The bonus is that all my real-life experience added up while in school and I landed a full-time job as a school psychologist before I even graduated.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. God, Andrea, how did you know? That’s exactly what I’m working on right now. I have my finger in a number of areas … I love them all AND I observe myself moving from one to another sometimes like, “I better get this done so I can do the other thing.” My intention is to be right here and now, and just take my next step (with joy ❤ ). Love your blog, and many blessings. ~Debbie

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Bravo for you! I was thinking my daughter used to wish away the weeks like this! Still when I remind her that she has her entire lifetime to achieve her goals there is no rush she says mom stop I’m in a hurry. 😀 I love that you teach young hearts and minds. Blessings to you as you bless other daily! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Helen Diane Wood AKA Dr. Di

    Wow, Dr. D.

    Your message to your students and all those who read your blog is very uplifting and positive.

    From the time you were very little, your light shone through, your generosity was felt and your tenacity allowed you to be who you are today.

    I am so blessed to be your mom.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Mom! I had (have) an incredible mentor in you.
      You always gave me the space to make my own mistakes.
      And were always waiting with a wide open embrace.
      Helping me to rise up, again & again. ☀️☀️

      Like

    1. Thank you! I love working with young adults. They are so open to new ideas & different ways of thinking.

      And thank you for sharing your characterization of waiting. The ups & downs of waiting reminds me of life itself. One more reason why mindfulness is our ultimate equalizer.

      Liked by 1 person

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